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Author Topic: Tissue culture the layman's way.  (Read 6967 times)

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Offline Gerhard Faber

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Tissue culture the layman's way.
« on: February 20, 2009, 17:55:42 »
Our own genetics boffin, Prof. Johan Spies, once told me that the best plant material for micro propagation is the peduncle. I found that very interesting because it meant that one could micro propagate a special plant without actually sacrificing the plant. Further research confirmed this and there is general consensus that the most suitable part is the area where the pedicels are joined to the peduncle.

Well look for yourself, the scientists are right and this surely proves it. What is interesting is that the "tissue cultured" plant emerged at a point in between the three pedicels carrying the berries. The three pedicels are actually joined to the base of the little plant. The question is, why at that specific point and why not at a point where the pedicels do not carry berries.

Look at the offset emerging from in between the leaves. Are the two plants carrying the exact same genes as the mother? Furthermore, is the one on the peduncle going to carry a mixed bag of genes from the seeds in the three berries. And so I can go on and on and on with the speculation?

Are there any brave ones out there that can unravel this genetic puzzle or at least give it a shot? Hint - remember the meristem cultured Vico Yellow plants that flowered with different traits.


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Kind regards and all of the best.
Gerhard Faber      
Clivia Couture...Designing The Future
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Offline Grant

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2009, 18:56:24 »
Very interesting Gerhard. I wonder if incisions were made on the peduncle if one could get it to form more offsets?

Offline John Mann

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2009, 19:17:27 »
I am not sure that I can agree that this is micro-propagation.
I would think that this plantlet is a proliferation.
It can be initiated by wounding the tissue at a point and encouraged by the addition of hormonal agents.
This is a natural occurance in some other plants and is often considered a fault in show quality flowers such as Daylilies.
If one stretches thoughts a bit, it should be thought of as an offset and the proliferation has all and exactly the same genetic makeup of the mother plant We all know that offsets are not always cosmetically the same as the mother, but a prolif is.
This is a very good way to increase that plant without endangering the mother, but is not commercially viable. Takes far too long to make any number of plants. A couple at a time is about all one can hope for without stressing the mother.

It is vital that the prolif not be removed too early. It will sometimes form rudimentary roots (nubs) and then is the earliest it can be safely removed. If possible, harvest any berries when ripe, cut off the pedunkle, just under the prolif, and plant it is a mix of 80% course sand/20% organic material. Keep damp and out of harsh light. Carefully check for root growth every couple of weeks and when satisfied that it has roots, start to lightly feed a good fertilizer to encourage bottom growth. I use my old Alfalfa mixture that can be found in another subject area. Look it up !!!:}
Pot up the next year and treat as you would any other young Clivia.
Hope this helps a bit.
Best,
John
Work like you don't need the money, love like you've never been hurt, and dance like you do when nobody's watching. Life is short. Make it mean something.

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Offline Charl Coetzee

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2009, 21:41:57 »
Hi all

"This study has shown that the fruit wall is the most successful explant for in vitro multiplication of Clivia"  (Clivia yearbook 1998, :8, JF Finnie).

Greetings, Charl Coetzee

Offline Geoforce (George Forsythe)

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2009, 05:40:16 »
In Hemerocallis (Daylily) world we have for years been promoting proliferations from dormant growth initials on flowering scapes by use of a kinetin in lanolin cream.  Perhaps applying such a cream to the pedicle or the peduncles would give such a result here also. 

As for the genetics Gerhard, i believe all areas are identical to the mother plant as many genus of plants form nucellar embryos in the seed itself  with same genetics.

George
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Offline Gerhard Faber

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2010, 10:57:55 »
Just an update.
Whilst re-potting and feeding my plants the past month I followed John Mann's good advice and planted the proliferation, seed and all. Interestingly, another peduncle on the same plant did the same but I had to discard the little proliferation because an amaryllis worm ruined the peduncle.

18 Months later - 10 leaves and an aerial root
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Closeup
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Kind regards
Gerhard Faber
Clivia Couture...Designing The Future
Registered Flora Grower: No AAA005-00309-0042
Licenced Seller of Protected Flora: No 0051-AAA005-01083    
54 Arbour Rd    +27 44 8741325
George, 6529   +27 834120011
South Africa     gfaber@mweb.co.za

Offline Roger Fisher

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2010, 11:54:05 »
Gerhard
This is fascinating.
I'm sorry we lost John Mann from the Forum.
I see he became active at one point on the Enthusiasts group, as did Paul-Michael, both after bouts of ill health.
I do hope they're well.
Thanks for the update.
Regards
Roger

Offline Humus

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2010, 13:06:01 »
one question, would this had happen on a stalk with no seeds being produced??
also could you wrap a bit of sphagnum moss around the base to stimulate earlier root growth??
                                                                              ..............Humus
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Offline Michael

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2010, 13:22:30 »
Gerhard,
This thread has made me do what the very best posts do: go outside and look at my plants! This is very interesting.

Humus, I was just wondering about the berries too. The presence of berries must have an influence on the whole peduncle to stop it dying off. Some plants probably keep their peduncles longer after seed harvest than others.

In any case, I'd love to get hold of some keiki paste and do some work on the base of the pedicels of some plants after flowering season this year. Would kynetin cosmetic cream work? Does anyone have access to this stuff?

Offline Geoforce (George Forsythe)

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2010, 14:36:15 »
Michael,
I've used the 'keiki paste' on many a plant of hemerocallis and on phalenopsis orchids with great success.  Bought mine from the Canadian firm who is on the net.   Would imagine that the best approach would be to tear off the sheath braces which cover the buds, and apply to the surface here. 

Just my thoughts.
George Forsythe

Learn something new each day.  If you're not learning you're not living.

Online Nick Woods

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2013, 12:01:49 »
I came across this while doing a web search on tissue culture of Clivias.

Has anybody taken this concept further? I would be interested to learn Members' views- it would seem to me to offer an potentially very useful addition to our tecniques!
 

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Offline Mark Hemmingsen

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2013, 15:18:36 »
Interesting topic ..!

- and thanks to Nick for pulling this topic up from the archive!

Offline neilneilneilneilneil

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2017, 12:42:54 »
Very interesting thread. These plants are just fantastic!!!
If you not dreaming. You're just sleeping.

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Online Mike Nagle

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Re: Tissue culture the layman's way.
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2017, 16:28:34 »
Very interesting indeed.  Thanks Neil and Nick, for bumping this thread.  It should be "stickied."
Salt Lake City, Utah  USA

 


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